Who's Ms. R?

Who's Ms. R?

At Liberty Bottleworks we value not only the homegrown roots of our sustainable company, but also the deep roots of our country where all of our products are made. America’s roots are unique, like nothing else that can be found on this planet. They’re rough and ragged, and sometimes ugly, yet from the ugly parts grow roots that are beautiful, smooth, and strong.

When you think of World War II a lot of ugly roots were growing in our world. If you know any basic history you’re probably already well aware of the things that went on during the mid 20th century. Thankfully though, we as a country, along with all of our allied friends from around the world, were able to take those jagged and damaged roots and turn them into something beautiful.

Colorization by Mads Dahl Madsen

Colorization by Mads Dahl Madsen

One beautiful thing that came from the WWII era was that of Rosie the Riveter, or as we like to call her, Ms. R. Everyone knows the bandana clad tenacious face of Rosie, yet not everyone knows this icon's story. [2]

Ms. R is like the ultra cool youger sister of Uncle Sam. She made her first debut in the hit 1943 song, Rosie the Riveter written by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb and performed by the Four Vagabonds. Norman Rockwell would fall in love with the song and paint his own depiction of Rosie, a powerful woman posed like the famous ceiling painting of Profit Isaiah. [2]

Photo by Norman Rockwell

Photo by Norman Rockwell

Rockwell based the looks of Rosie after Mary Keefe, a dental hygienist. Unknown by many though, a Rosie had been created the previous year by the Westinghouse Power Company. The boasting "We Can Do It!" slogan was created to boost moral within the company and ended up inspiring an entire nation. Rockwell's and Westinghouse Power Company's Rosie would ignite a frenzy from the media where they would endlessly search for the perfect real-life Rosie, yet what they would soon come to find is that Rosie wasn't a singular woman. [2] Rosie was and still is every single American woman that puts her boots on and goes to work every day next to her fellow man and gets the job done no matter what it takes.

Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt

Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt

First lady, Eleanor Roosevelt put it best when she said[4]:

A woman is like a tea bag; you never know how strong it is until it’s in hot water.
— Eleanor Roosevelt

Everyone was in hot water during the war, and when the men had to go off and play their part the woman took no time to step up and do their part too. It all started with the six million women who answered Rosie’s call in 1943.[2] Women would take the place of their absent men in jobs that provided for the U.S.’s domestic interests and for their defense interests. What came of the women who took on jobs in defense was nothing short of impressive. Women would take clerical jobs in the armed forces like driving trucks, repairing planes, working as lab technicians, rigging parachutes, radio operators, and much more. These working groups of women would go on to create the Women’s Army Corps (WAAC), Navy Women’s Reserve (WAVES), the Marine Corps Women’s Reserve, the Coast Guard Women’s Reserve (SPARS), the Army Nurses Corps, the Navy Nurse Corps, and the infamous Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS).[5]

Photo by Bernard Hoffman

Photo by Bernard Hoffman

While Uncle Sam was calling for America’s men to take up arms, Rosie was calling on the women to take up jobs previously believed to have been completely out of a woman’s capability. But just like our country’s men, the women went above and beyond proving that they are just as unbreakably strong and tenacious. Ms. R and her ideals are still carried today, a reminder to everyone that we have a part to play in caring for the prosperity of our nation and everyone in it.

[1]Photos courtesy of @historyphotographed

[2]Info courtesy of History

[3]Photos courtesy of Saturday Evening Post

[4]Quote courtesy of Good Reads

[5]Info courtesy of National WWII Museum

Did You See Us in the Seattle Times?

Did You See Us in the Seattle Times?

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